Tuesday, February 28, 2012

Buying second hand, first


[photo source]
Things break. Things deteriorate. Even when I was a child back in the 70's, when the television stopped working, you called the repair man to the house and he fixed it (for a reasonable price, mind you). Now, when the television stops working, you throw it away and get a new one. It's just mind boggling how we've become a throw away society.

vintage utensils
source

I try to buy second hand whenever I can. If the egg flip snaps, I head to my local thrift store to replace it. If my son needs football shoes, I head to the thrift store. (Which, by the way, I picked up for $4 the other day.) Some of the dollar stores (and even KMart in Australia) have excellent priced goods for these sorts of things but the biggest problem I have, is I tend to walk out with a lot more than I really need. I don't think I'm alone there.  I do like collecting things like depression glass and vintage linen so the thrift stores can be a bit of a temptation to me as well but I try to show restraint, don't go over budget and only get what I need.

[photo source]
Big ticket items such as televisions, refrigerators and furniture can often be picked up for free on Freecycle. I picked up 3 seater and 2 seater lounges for free on Freecycle. It's like brand new. I also picked up a second hand second fridge for nothing from Freecycle. You really can get by on second hand, most of the time. I don't go second hand on everything, for example underwear, but in order to live within my means and enjoy most things most of the time, this is how I manage it.

ebay, Gumtree, Facebook and Craigslist are also wonderful options for searching for secondhand items as are yard sales and the classified ads in the newspaper. When the children were small, I got nearly all of their clothes as either hand-me-downs or from second hand sources. As they've got older (now 7 and 5) clothes aren't holding up to the rough and tumble so I look at end of season sales, in the next size up.

[photo source]
Think about buying second hand next time. You never know what treasures you might find and they'll probably last a lot longer than what the things that are made nowadays do.






This post is part of domesblissity's THRiVING - Thrifty Living feature.

16 comments:

  1. I do exactly the same thing Anne :) I love Charity shops but my only problem is that my list of things I 'need' tends to be a little fexlible once I get in there.

    Freecycle is fantastic too although I've mostly given things away rather than found new things but even that saves the trouble of having to move things.

    Most of my clothes are second hand (or vintage;) and lots of my kitchen wear as well as a few really beautiful things (that I WILL one day do a post on) that really make my house a home.

    Other people's junk or forgotten treasures? I know what I call them :) x

    ReplyDelete
  2. The older my kids get the hard it is to find secondhand clothes...well actually by the time they reach my teens age it is easier again because she wears adult sized clothing. I rarely find shoes for them secondhand and I am guessing it is because most kids completely wear their shoes out just like mine do! There is a secondhand store near me where everything you can fit into a brown paper bag costs $5.00!

    ReplyDelete
  3. Anne,
    You are right on target! I have come to really love our local Goodwill Store (we don't have a good thrift store locally). I have found some great items: some in mint condition and some need some TLC. Either way, I look there first for items!

    :)

    Marilyn

    ReplyDelete
  4. My mother's television just broke and she went out and purchased a new one. I was telling my children that when I was younger we always called a repairman to fix broken appliances, now we just throw them away and buy something new. Great post!

    ReplyDelete
  5. You have convinced me, I'm on board.

    ReplyDelete
  6. You are so right! Plus it's much more fun to shop when there's the thrill of the hunt for something great for cheap. I need to try Freecycle!

    ReplyDelete
  7. You made me chuckle with the lady and frig photo. But I so agree. Accept for computers practically every single piece of furniture we own is 2nd hand. Is there any other way? Love your practicality and common sense Anne. We need more people like you in this world of commercialism and money spending. Another great post.

    Nann

    ReplyDelete
  8. I do a lot of op shopping and accept all hand me downs. Clothing kids can be expensive and growing feet my goodness. I picked up a patten leather pair of pumpkin patch Mary janes for Little V the other day for a $1.

    With kids who are about tun three and the other who has just turned one, I would say at least 80% of their clothing has been thrifted, gifted, handmade or hand me down.

    A lot of furniture is the same too, and I have picked up some mch loved pieces that are retro and cheap.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Great post...and Never pay full retail...my little mantra for shopping, teaching my kids the same, shop around and spend your money wisely :)

    ReplyDelete
  10. I live around the corner from a giant Salvos Store. What can I say - bliss!!!!

    ReplyDelete
  11. Great post - i buy second hand when i can. I did not realise craig's list and freecycle were doing well in Australia now - must explore them as we need a sofa bed before ILs arrive this year and there is no room in the money stakes for one right now. I use ebay a lot and the flea market where I get my weekly fruit and veg too! i wish our thrift stores / salvos etc were better around here but very hit and miss.

    ReplyDelete
  12. You are SO onto it! My 14month old son has only had ONE outfit bought brand new for him because all my friends have boys at least one year older than him.... And I still have boxes for this year too :-)

    Op shops are different to friends hand-me-downs though, I think. I dont know where or how to look kinda thing. I think its an artform.... However, several weeks ago I asked a thrifty friend of mine to teach me how to op-shop. Thanks for the reminder, I'll definitely get on with it now!
    xC

    ReplyDelete
  13. Oh how I love this post! We've become such a disposable society & it's so sad.

    Sadly it seems that sometimes to get things repaired is more expensive than buying a new item though.

    It's amazing what you can find out there when you start looking!

    ReplyDelete
  14. I never have any luck at op shops. Everything is always so ordinary, and it seems like a waste of time. Obviously I'm not doing to right, because others seem to swear by them.
    Maybe I would look again.

    ReplyDelete
  15. I think there is an art to thrift shop purchases... and one that I haven't figured out yet. Maybe it simply boils down to time and a little creative flair? You've convinced me to give it a second chance anyway :)

    ReplyDelete
  16. I'm sittimg here with my first morning cuppa, thoroughly enjoying your blog Anne. Ive been meaning to pop over so many times for so long. Love this post--I love second hand shopping too, and the great thing is the money usually goes to charities, which is always awesome. I'm a sucker for vintage, and always come out with way too much stuff! its a great money saver all the same though, and people always ask where I got things because theyre so unique. should see their eyes bulge when I tell them where I got them!

    ReplyDelete

Thank you for stopping by my blog. I love reading what you have to say and love replying via email.